Organize Azure resources in resource groups using portal, PowerShell, Azure CLI

Microsoft.VisualStudio.Services.IconsWhen you create, update, and delete resources in Azure you are using the Azure Resource Manager (ARM). Azure Resource Manager provides access control, tagging, auditing of your resources.

In this article, you use the portal, PowerShell, the Azure Command Line Interface (CLI) to create, manage access and delete resources. Links are provided in the reference section of this chapter for you to learn how to manage resources using the REST API.

You create resources in either an imperative way by describing each of the steps and feature with scripts. In a following post, you will learn how to create resources using a declarative syntax with an ARM template to describe the features and properties.

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Requirements, plan for your enterprise Azure Subscription for production

Cloud Adoption Framework
Microsoft’s Cloud Adoption Framework

You can get started in Azure. But soon it becomes time to build your subscriptions for your enterprise. For example, giving unrestricted access to developers can make your devs very agile, but it can also lead to unintended cost consequences. In addition, you will want to have requirements to demonstrate compliance for security, monitoring, and resource access control.

In this article we help organize some thoughts around the strategy and plan for building out your cloud, including a plan that you can put into Azure DevOps.

The Cloud Adoption Framework provides guidance for in depth analysis and preparation for your cloud. 

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Best Practices for Designing a Fluent API

imageA fluent API can be incredibly helpful when sharing your application with other developers.

Fluent methods are a hot design idea and they can improve the readability of your code. However, they only make sense in specific scenarios.

A fluent interface (as first coined by Eric Evans and Martin Fowler) is a method for constructing object oriented APIs, where the readability of the source code is close to that of ordinary written prose.
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CloudDays™ – Introduction to Azure Content Delivery Network (CDN)

cdnAzure Content Delivery Network (CDN) is designed to send audio, video, applications, images, and other files faster and more reliably to customers using servers that are closest to each user.  If you want to put binary files and blobs closer to your user, then CDN can be the right solution.

The CDN caches publicly available objects at strategically placed locations to provide maximum bandwidth for delivering content to users.

Essentially, when a user wants some content, the first user gets the data from the source server. When you use a CDN, that data is then cached at a site near the user. So subsequent users can get the data from the cache instead of going all the way back to the source server. For example, if a picture stored in a blob is in a European data center in Azure, a user in Portland Oregon would be able to access the file from a server set up in Seattle, making your image load much faster.

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CloudDays™ – Quick Start to Azure Redis Cache

redisAzure Redis Cache helps your application become more responsive even as user load increases and leverages the low latency, high-throughput capabilities of the Redis engine. This separate distributed cache layer allows your data tier to scale independently for more efficient use of compute resources in your application layer.

Redis is an open source, BSD licensed, advanced key-value cache and store. It is often referred to as a data structure server since keys can contain strings, hashes, lists, sets, sorted sets, bitmaps and hyperloglogs. Redis supports a set of atomic operations on these data types.

Microsoft Azure Redis Cache is based on this cache and store. It gives you access to a secure, dedicated Redis cache, managed by Microsoft, providing the best of both worlds: the rich features and ecosystem of Redis, and reliable hosting and monitoring by Microsoft.

You can use Redis from most programming languages used today.

Azure Redis Cache leverages Redis authentication and also supports SSL connections to Redis.

The purpose of this article is to help you decide if Azure Redis is the right technology for your project. The Azure documentation is pretty good to help you get started, but is spread all over the place, so this article focuses on the steps to get started, and gives you a peek into what your code looks like. (If you are like me, you can often tell if the technology is a good fit by seeing code.)

NOTE: Of course, you can use Redis without Azure. For more information on that, see Distributed Caching using Redis Server with .NET/C# Client.

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CloudDays™ – Choosing the Right Azure Cache Technology

azurecloudMicrosoft Azure Cache is a family of distributed, in-memory, scalable solutions that enable you to build highly scalable and responsive applications by providing super-fast access to your data. But what do you choose?

This post provides you with an overview of the options you have when you are considering caching technologies.

Microsoft Azure Cache is available in the following offerings.

Microsoft offers a strong recommended choice for these caches. “Microsoft recommends all new developments use Azure Redis Cache.”

That said, this post discusses each to give you a quick overview. This article also introduces you to one other cache.

Here’s the short answer:

  • Use Azure Redis Cache when you want to cache string, hashes, .NET classes, data.
  • Use CDN when you want to cache audio, video, applications, images, and other files.

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CloudDays™ Quick Start – Introduction to Design Methodology, Patterns for REST

In his talk on Some REST Design Patterns (and Anti-Patterns), Cesare Pautasso explains, “REST architectural style is simple to define, but understanding how to apply it to design concrete REST services in support of SOA can be more complex.”

Several SOA Design Patterns:

  • Uniform Contract
  • Endpoint Redirection
  • Content Negotiation
  • Idempotent Capability

In this post,  you will learn the design methodology, walk through a step by step scenario where the client and server trade information to perform a set of actions, and you will learn more about the SOA design patterns.

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CloudDays™ Quick Start – Designing Your RESTful API Part 3: Best Practices

imageIn the previous posts, you learned how to design your RESTful API. In this post, you will learn about the best practices of versioning, analytics, how to set up your API root, what your consumers are expecting for results,  why and how filtering should work, and caching.

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CloudDays™ Quick Start – Designing Your RESTful API Part 2: The Verbs, Responses, Response Status Codes

imageIn the post Designing Your RESTful API Part 1: The Nouns, you learned the importance of resources, request headers, and the request body when you defined your RESTful API. In this post, you will learn about the five or so request verbs and what is send back to the client in the response body and the response status code.

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CloudDays™ Quick Start – Designing Your RESTful API Part 1: The Nouns

imageEverything is a resource in REST. As you learned in Choosing Between RESTful Web Service, SOAP, Representational State Transfer (REST) is an architecture style or design pattern for creating web services which allow anything connected to a network to something else on the network using Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP).

In this post, you will learn the how to define your resource identifier. In the following post, you will learn how to use the HTTP verbs and response codes. And along the way you will learn many of the principles of a good RESTful API.

Let me second what As Thomas Hunter II writes:

The easier your API is to consume, the more people that will consume it.

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