Getting Started with Azure CLI, WSL 2, Windows Terminal

linuxThe Azure CLI is foundational to getting started in Azure, Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) is an optional feature of Windows 10 that allows you to run Linux on Windows, and the Windows Terminal. For those of us who spend time in Microsoft Teams, Microsoft Office and want to work with Visual Studio Code, it is the perfect combination.

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Getting Started with Containers for ASP.NET Developers on Windows

worksonmymachineContainers give you a way to run you application in a controlled environment, isolated from other applications running on the machine and from the underlying infrastructure.

It means that when you go to deploy, all the dependencies are published together. So you can finally say, “It worked on my machine” and mean it. All the dependencies with the same versions in your container will be there when you deploy to the cloud.

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Best Practices for Designing a Fluent API

imageA fluent API can be incredibly helpful when sharing your application with other developers.

Fluent methods are a hot design idea and they can improve the readability of your code. However, they only make sense in specific scenarios.

A fluent interface (as first coined by Eric Evans and Martin Fowler) is a method for constructing object oriented APIs, where the readability of the source code is close to that of ordinary written prose.
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Object JavaScript – Code Walkthrough of a jQuery UI Widget

imageIn the last post, Building Stateful jQuery UI Plugin Using Widget Factory, you were introduced to the working structure of jQuery UI Widgets. You learned that it uses the factory pattern is a way to generate different objects with a common interface. And that it Widget Factory adds features to jQuery plug-in.

jQuery UI Widget Factory is under jQuery UI, but you can use it separately for your own widgets. In this post, you will learn the steps you can take to build your own widget. This posts walks through an implementation of the filterable dropdown from Adam J. Sontag’s and Corey Frang’s post: The jQuery UI Widget Factory WAT? 

My motivation in this post is to show what goes where when you are designing your widgets. And provide some direction in the steps you can take when building a widget from scratch.

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Object JavaScript – Building Stateful jQuery UI Plugin Using Widget Factory

imageIn this post, you will learn step-by-step to build your own custom, reusable, testable jQuery UI widget.

You will extend the jQuery library with custom UI code and then use it on a page. The initial plug-in will be trivial to demonstrate the jQuery Widget Factory pattern. You will provide properties that you can change to change the look of your widget and you will provide some methods that will respond to user input.

In this post example, you will learn how to create a simple click counter. Click a button, increase the count. The idea is to show you the steps to create a jQuery UI Widget.

The Widget Factory system manages state, allows multiple functions to be exposed via a single plugin, and provides various extension points.

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