Snippets – Filtering JSON Using jQuery Grep, Filter, Map

6327_image_58FAEDFAWhen you have a JSON array, you may want to get one or more items from the array and display. jQuery offers two functions that can help: grep and filter.

  • $.grep(). Finds the elements of an array which satisfy a filter function. The original array is not affected.
  • $filter(). Reduce the set of matched elements to those that match the selector or pass the function’s test.
  • $.map(). applies a function to each item in the array, thus returning a modified array

In other words, $.grep() removes items from an array as necessary so that all remaining items pass a provided test; .filter() constructs a new jQuery object from a subset of the matching elements.

Also, filter is intended to be used with html elements, and that is why it is a chainable function that returns a jQuery object and it accepts filters like “:even”, “:odd” or “:visible” etc. You can’t do that with the grep function, which is intended to be a utility function for arrays.

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Single Page App – isLoading jQuery Plugin to Indicate Content Loads

imageWhen you’re loading information using jQuery AJAX, you may want to provide visual feedback when loading data or for any action that would take time.

In this Snippet, you will learn how to:

  • Load JSON data from a getJSON call to our server.
  • Show and hide a spinning indicator inside a div.
  • Bind the incoming data to a view model object.
  • Use the view model to populate an external template.

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Then once the page is loaded, it will display the data based on an external template.

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And we’ll provide some tips on how you you can use the IsLoading library to display the loading indicator on top of the page while loading and on top of the div itself.

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Single Page Apps – Retrieving, Caching Server Requests Using AmplifyJS

image8You may want to use storage to store data. You can save the data your user has entered in a wizard. Or you might want to save data so you can provide an offline experience. Or you may want to store user preferences. Local storage is a good idea anytime you do not want, or need your user or your application to start all over.

AmplifyJS is a very neat library that provides a consistent API to handle client storage that works in most browsers.

In this post, you will learn to retrieve the data through amplify.request without concern for data caching, server interface, resource location, data types, wrappers, and all the other specificities of the client/server interaction.

Requests made through amplify.request will always be resolved asynchronously, even if the resource invokes the callbacks immediately.

You will probably need jQuery for Amplify Request. The default request type shipped with AmplifyJS does utilize jQuery AJAX, but you can just as easily create a new request type that uses Dojo, MooTools, etc.

However the publish/subscribe and store components do not use jQuery at all.

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Single Page Apps – Store Your Data Locally in Knockout Using AmplifyJS

image8[3]Amplify store and Knockout can be great partners. For example, you can use client storage to improve user experience, remembering user preferences or previously entered values such that the user doesn’t have to start all over.

There is a tutorial on Knockout that provides for client storage. In the tutorial, Knockout uses Amplify to restore user data when the user revisits the site.

You can augment Knockout observables with additional functionality, by using extenders.

You can use extender to automatically store and restore any observable property. Continue reading “Single Page Apps – Store Your Data Locally in Knockout Using AmplifyJS”

Single Page Apps – Local Data Store with AmplifyJS

imageYou may want to use storage to store data. You can save the data your user has entered in a wizard. Or you might want to save data so you can provide an offline experience. Or you may want to store user preferences. Local storage is a good idea anytime you do not want, or need your user or your application to start all over.

AmplifyJS is a very neat library that provides a consistent API to handle client storage that works in most browsers.

Of course, you can use HTML5 Local Storage. But amplify.store supports IE 5+, Firefox 2+, Safari 4+, Chrome, Opera 10.5+, iPhone 2+, Android 2+ and provides a consistent API to handle storage cross-browser.

Note: Because of the JSON dependency, you need to add json2.js for support in browsers without native JSON support, including IE 5, IE 6, IE 7, Firefox 2.0 and Firefox 3.0.

Continue reading “Single Page Apps – Local Data Store with AmplifyJS”